Reading the Defense and Responding, not Reacting
How many times have you heard a coach yell, "Read the defense before reacting." First things first, don't react to an action, respond. Human reacts when they are scared, however, they respond when calm and have an alternative. When a post player understands the scoring options, he or she can respond to what the defensive player does. However, with only the jump-shot, fake-away jump shot, and a jump-hook shot as scoring options, a post player is forced to react under pressure. There are14 scoring options that a post player can respond to from the blocks without dribbling the basketball. With these options, her or she can respond to just about every situation that a defensive player present. These are the scoring options:

1. Straight Jump Shot:
If the defensive plays off you, guarding against the dribble, you can shoot a straight jump shot from the side power position. Click scoring options to see the video on Youtube.

2. Step-out Jump Shot:
If the defensive gets too close, you can step-out with a jump shot from the side power position.

3. Step-back Jump Shot:<
If the defensive gets too close where you cannot step out, you can step back with a jump shot from the side power position.

4. Forward Double-step Jump Shot:
If the defensive player gets to close, you can also step-forward with a double-step jump shot. Be sure to jump off both feet after the forward-step to avoid a traveling violation.

5. Crossover Double-step Jump Shot:
If the defensive player overplays your strong side, you can crossover-step by him or her, and shoot a double-step jump shot. Again, jump off both feet after the crossover step to avoid a traveling violation. If you have a functioning left hand shot, it will make this option even more difficult to defend.

6. Reverse Double-step Jump Shot:
If you can't use options 4 or 5 because the defensive is up close and straddling you, reverse and shoot a double-step jump shot away from the defensive player. This option is particular advantageous for big slower players who can use their wide body to shield the basketball after the reverse step. If you have a functioning left hand shot, it will make this option even more difficult to defend.

7. Straight-up Jump Hook Shot:
If the defensive plays off you, guarding against the dribble, you can shoot a jump hook shot from the power position. Notice that the jump hook shot is only effective inside the paint. It lacks the proper rhythm and coordination to make it an effective option outside the painted area.

8. Forward Double-step Jump Hook Shot:
If the defensive player gets to close, you can step-forward with a double-step jump hook shot. Be sure to jump off both feet after the forward-step to avoid a traveling violation.

9. Crossover Double-step Jump Hook Shot:
If the defensive player overplays your strong side, you can crossover step and shoot a double-step jump hook shot. If you have a functioning left hand shot, it will make this option even more difficult to defend.

10. Reverse Double-step Jump Hook Shot:
If you can't use options 8 or 9, you can reverse and shoot a double-step jump hook shot away from the defensive player. This option is particular advantageous for big slower players who can use their wide body to shield the basketball after the reverse step. If you have a functioning left hand shot, it will make this option even more difficult to defend.

11. Straight-up Conventional One-step Hook Shot:
If you have a functioning conventional one-step hook shot, you can use these options anywhere around the basket. These options have good rhythm and coordination, which makes it more effective than the more popular jump hook shot. Learn more about this magnificent options visit master-piece on Youtube.

12. Forward Step Conventional One-step Hook Shot:
If the defensive player gets to close, you can step-forward, and shoot a conventional one-step hook shot. Be sure to check with your coach to see if your league allows a step after you pick up the dribble before you can use these options. Most leagues will allow this option if you use it as a series (fake and step option to the basket).

13. Crossover Conventional One-step Hook Shot:
If the defensive player overplays your strong side, you can crossover-step by him or her and shoot a conventional one-step hook shot. Be sure to check with your coach to see if your league allows a step after you pick up the dribble before you can use these options. Most leagues will allow the option if you use it as a series (fake and step option to the basket). If you have a functioning week left hand shot, it will make this option even more difficult to defend.

14. Reverse Conventional One-step Hook Shot:
If you can't use options 12 or 13, you can reverse, and shoot a conventional one-step hook shot away from the defensive player. This option is particular advantageous for big slower players who can use their wide body to shield the basketball after the reverse step. Be sure to check with your coach to see if your league allows a step after you pick up the dribble before you can use these options. Most leagues will allow this option if you use it as a series (fake and step option to the basket). If you have a functioning left hand shot, it will make this option even more difficult to defend.

Note:
These scoring options are described from a right-handed player's perspective. If you are left-handed simply swap "left for right." Also, notice that the moves for each series are basically the same. You don't have to learn anything new. All you have to do is change the finishing touch. Instead of using the jump shot, you can use the jump hook or the conventional one-step hook shot to really mess with the defensive player's head. That;'s all there is to becoming a dominant post player; being in the business of taking the same product, giving it a new label and selling it to unsuspecting defensive player.


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